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Draft

Boating  Downwind  Drag
04/24/2014

Draft
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Depth of water needed to float a boat or ship; the distance from the waterline to the deepest / lowest point of the keel.


Draft: the depth of a ship in the water. The vertical distance between the waterline and the keel, in the u.s. expressed in feet, elsewhere in meters.
Drayage: charge made for local hauling by dray or truck.

Air draught (or draft) is the distance from the surface of the water to the highest point on a vessel, similar to the "deep draught" of a vessel which is measured from the surface of the water to the deepest part of the hull below the surface, ...

DRAFT OR DRAUGHT: The measurement of how deeply a boat sits in the water.
DRY ROT: A fungus decay which causes wood to become soft and to fall apart.
DUCKBOARD: The wooden floorboards found on many yachts’ cockpit soles
E ...

Draft
Taking into account the draft in relation to the available depth of water will help avoid running aground. If you are at a slower speed in shallow water, you may avoid running hard aground and damaging your vessel.

Draft- the vertical distance from the waterline to the lowest point of the keel; it is the minimum depth of water in which a vessel will float.
Forward- aboard a boat, the direction to the front, to the bow.

Draft - The depth of water required to float a pleasure craft freely.
Fenders - Devices used to protect the side of a pleasure craft and absorb shock.
Gale Warning - Sustained winds at speeds from 34 to 47 knots inclusive.

Draft
"Draft" is the vertical measurement from the waterline to the lowest portion of the bottom of the boat, usually either the keel or propeller.

Draft ...........................
The depth of the vessel below the water line, measured vertically to the lowest part of the hull, propeller, or other reference point
Electrolysis ..............

Draft: Water depth required to float the vessel.
Drogue: A surface anchor to hold bow or stern to wind.

draft
Vertical distance a boat penetrates the water.
drogue
A parachute-like sea anchor.

Draft
1) The depth of a boat, measured from the deepest point to the waterline. The water must be at least this depth, or the boat will run aground. 2) A term describing the amount of curvature designed into a sail.

Draft:
The depth of water which a pleasure craft requires to float freely.
Light Winds:
Winds with speeds less than 12 knots as defined by Environment Canada.

Draft- The depth of water required to float a boat. The depth of a boat from waterline to keel.
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top
Ease- To loosen. To let out the line of a sail.

Draft
The minimum depth of water in which a vessel will float.
Ebb Tide ...

Draft or draught - The depth of a ship's keel below the waterline.
E
Ebb - A receding current, when the falling tide recedes out to sea and the water level lowers.

draft or draught - The vertical distance between the vessel's waterline and its lowest point; the lowest point may be the hull itself or an attachment (such as a rudder or propeller). The minimum water depth in which a boat will float.

Draft:
(1) The depth of the boat below the waterline; the amount of vertical distance from a boats water line to the bottom of it's keel.
(2) The depth of water necessary to float a vessel
(3) The belly or chord depth of the sail, its fullness ...

Draft
the depth of the boat at its lowest point, also the depth or fullness of the sail
Drift ...

Draft is either 6 feet, 6 inches or 5 feet, 3 inches depending on your choice of keel. The deep fin shows an extended trailing edge fillet, which I would assume is to facilitate the mating surface at the hull for both keel models.

DRAFT - The draft is the distance the pontoon tubes go under the water, most pontoon boats have a shallow draft.
E
EBB - A receding current.

Draft/Draught
The amount of vertical distance from a boat's water line to the bottom of it's keel. This is the depth of water required to float a vessel.
Draw ...

DRAFT - The depth of water a boat draws.
E
EASE - To slacken or relieve tension on a line.

Draft - Depth of the keel
Draft - Least depth of water needed to allow a boat to clear the bottom
Draw Bridge Signal - one long blast and three short blasts ...

Draft - The depth of water a boat draws.
Dry Sailing - When boats, especially smaller racers, are kept on shore instead of being left anchored or moored, they are dry sailed. The practice prevents marine growth ...

Draft restrictions relate to speed in several ways. If there is little underkeel clearance, it is likely that shallower water is nearby.

Draft - The depth of water a boat draws.
Ebb - A receding current.
Engine Bed - A structure of wooden or metal supports that make up the mounting for a ship's engine.

DRAFT : The depth of a ship's keel below the water line. The depth of water needed to float a vessel.
DUDS : Clothing, and not very good clothing at that.

Draft: The depth of water a boat draws.
Drift: 1. To move as driven or borne along by a current; to float or move along with the stream or wind 2.

Draft Distance between the waterline and the lowest part of the keel or hull. -The amount of bend in a sail's shape.

Draft: Depth of water needed to float a vessel
Freeboard: Distance from water to lowest point of boat where water could come aboard
Starboard: Right side of a vessel
All-Round White Light: Indicates rear of a vessel ...

Draft: The distance from the surface of the water to the ship's keel (how deep the ship is into the water).
Drag: A sea anchor contrived to keep a vessel's head to the wind and sea.

The term is often used to denote a pier or a wharf.
Dolphin
A group of piles driven close together and bound with wire cables into a single structure.
Draft
The depth of water a boat draws.

Draft: The depth of water that a boat draws
Drift: Strength of a tidal current
Driving force: Force produced by catching wind in a sail and transmitting the energy into a the mast ...

draft: the depth a vessel extends below the waterline. DR: dead reckoning, deduced reckoning; your position based on speed, direction, and time.

sea bottom (for bottom return mode) or suspended particulate matter in the seawater itself (for water return mode) by measuring the frequency shifts between a transmitted and subsequently echoed acoustic or electromagnetic signal.
Draft - The ...

Downhaul-A rope used to haul down jibs, staysails and studding sails.
Double Sheetbend -Join small to medium size rope.
douse To drop a sail quickly
Draft-The depth of water required float a vessel
Drift- A vessel leeway ...

DRAFT The depth of water a boat can travel over without hitting the bottom. DRY ROT A fungous decay causing seasoned lumber to become brittle and crumble to powder.

BALLAST WATER Sea water, confined to double bottom tanks, peak tanks, and other designated compartments, for use in obtaining satisfactory draft, trim, or stability.

draft -- water depth required to float the boat
ebb -- tide passing from high to low, with the current going out to sea
El Niño -- a warm inshore current annually flowing south along the coast of Ecuador.

Stern draft - bow draft
List, Heel, and Roll: Angular transverse inclinations. List describes a static inclination such as list due to side damage.

to latch DRAFT the distance from a vessel's water line to the deepest part of the hull; ...

Draft - least depth of water needed to allow a boat to clear the bottom.
Drift - speed of a current's flow.
DBWI - Driving a boat while intoxicated
Fairing Block- shim installed to adjust the angle of a mounted item.

DRAFT - The depth of water a boat draws.
FENDER - A cushion, placed between boats, or between a boat and a pier, to prevent damage.
FOLLOWING SEA - An overtaking sea that comes from astern.
FORWARD - Toward the bow of the boat.

Boats with restricted maneuverability, whether due to fishing, draft, length, towing, or other causes, have the right of way over vessels not so restricted.

Pier-head jump - When a sailor is drafted to a warship at the last minute, just before she sails.
Pilot - Navigator. A specially knowledgeable person qualified to navigate a vessel through difficult waters, e.g. harbour pilot etc.

- Scope is defined as the ratio of the depth (draft plus freeboard) divided into the length of anchor line paid out. The typical minimum scope is from 3-5 with 7 being the best practical.

Deep-draft and shallow-draft vessels handle differently. Boats that steer by changing the thrust direction- outboards and stern drive- respond differently than boats steered by rudders: the response of heavy displacement hulls to helm changes to ...

Halfway through dinner I suddenly felt a draft blowing through the main companionway; something was wrong-we were dragging anchor! I dashed up into the cockpit just in time to hear the horrible grinding of the boat's keel crashing into a coral head.

The maximum draft (aft) is usually not more than about two feet nine inches. Boats up to fourteen feet wide can be found and these area called in a somewhat contradictory fashion wide beam narrow boats.

To postpone the induction of (one eligible for the military draft). verb, intransitive To procrastinate. [Middle English differren, to postpone, differ.] . de-ferıra-ble adjective . de-ferırer noun Synonyms: defer, postpone, shelve, stay, suspend.

DORY A small, flat-bottomed boat with flaring sidesDRAFT The depth of a boat from the waterline to the bottom of the keel.
DOUBLE-ENDER; A boat which is ‘pointed' at both bow and stern, see also ‘CANOE STERN'.

skiffA small, simple, shallow-draft boat. skiing/wakeboarding boatLow profile, pleasure boats with minimal deadrise specifically designed for waterskiing and/or wakeboarding.

A keel that runs the length of the boat. Full keels have a shallower draft than fin keels.
fully battened
A sail having battens that run the full horizontal length of the sail.

Remember that you will have 100 knots of downdraft from the helo over your head. You will (hopefully) establish communications with the helo before they arrive on scene.

Cunningham: The cringle (grommet) on the luff (forward edge) of the sail used to achieve luff tension for draft control. (sail shaping)
Downhaul: Line used to tighten or tension the luff (forward edge) of the sail.

After studying the chart and choosing a general protected area, look for a spot with the right depth: from a few feet deeper than the draft of your boat (at low tide) to as deep as 30-40 feet if necessary-if you have at least 200-300 feet of anchor ...

CENTERBOARD-A pivoted board-like device that can be lowered to provide lateral resistance to the water in shoal draft vessels.
CLEW-Aftermost corner of a sail.
COAMING-Raised protection around a cockpit.

Crossing a narrow channel is best planned for a turn at high tide (or low tide if it's deep enough for your boat's draft) so the current doesn't exceed the speed of your boat.

Full keels have a shallower draft than fin keels.
Full-rigged-ship a fully square rigged ship with three or more masts.
Fully battened -A sail having battens that run the full horizontal length of the sail.

See also: See also: Boat, Hull, Sail, Beam, Feet

Boating  Downwind  Drag
04/24/2014

 
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