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Shoal-draft
Shoal-draft
(boat) One designed to float in less water than
the average for her size. Usually tends to be beamy.


Air draught (or draft) is the distance from the surface of the water to the highest point on a vessel, similar to the "deep draught" of a vessel which is measured from the surface of the water to the deepest part of the hull below the surface, but "air draught" is expressed as a height, ...

DRAFT OR DRAUGHT: The measurement of how deeply a boat sits in the water.
DRY ROT: A fungus decay which causes wood to become soft and to fall apart.
DUCKBOARD: The wooden floorboards found on many yachts’ cockpit soles
E
EASE: To slacken or relieve tension on a line.

Draft 0.1.7

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Draft
The depth of water required for a vessel to navigate. The distance from the waterline to the bottom of the vessel´s Keel.
Find Terms ...

Draft- the vertical distance from the waterline to the lowest point of the keel; it is the minimum depth of water in which a vessel will float.
Forward- aboard a boat, the direction to the front, to the bow.
Freeboard- the vertical distance from the waterline to the gunwale.

DRAFT
1) How deep the water must be to float a boat.
2) The belly or chord depth of the sail, its fullness
3) The depth of the boat below the waterline
4) The amount of water the boat draws from the water line to its greatest extremity below the water line.

Draft
Taking into account the draft in relation to the available depth of water will help avoid running aground. If you are at a slower speed in shallow water, you may avoid running hard aground and damaging your vessel.

Draft - how deep a boat settles in the water, the depth from the waterline to the bottom of her hull. "She's shallow on the draft" = a ship that can safely sail shallow water. A ship's draft will change if she takes on or lets off heavy cargo.

Draft: Water depth required to float the vessel.
Drogue: A surface anchor to hold bow or stern to wind.
Floors: Transverse frames that run across the keel but do not extend up the sides, also the portion of the hull between the keel and the turn of the bilge.

Draft ...........................
The depth of the vessel below the water line, measured vertically to the lowest part of the hull, propeller, or other reference point
Electrolysis ..............

Draft
How far down the ship sits in the water when it's loaded with people and supplies.
Embark ...

Draft - The depth of water required to float a pleasure craft freely.
Fenders - Devices used to protect the side of a pleasure craft and absorb shock.
Gale Warning - Sustained winds at speeds from 34 to 47 knots inclusive.

draft
Vertical distance a boat penetrates the water.
drogue
A parachute-like sea anchor.

Draft
1) The depth of a boat, measured from the deepest point to the waterline. The water must be at least this depth, or the boat will run aground. 2) A term describing the amount of curvature designed into a sail.

Draft:
The depth of water which a pleasure craft requires to float freely.
Light Winds:
Winds with speeds less than 12 knots as defined by Environment Canada.

DRAFT - Depth a hull is immersed, from the surface of the water to the lowest point of the hull, keel or other extension.

Draft
The minimum depth of water in which a vessel will float.
Ebb Tide ...

DRAFT (DFT) The depth of a ship in the water. The vertical distance between the waterline and the keel, in the U.S. expressed in feet, elsewhere in meters.
DRY CARGO SHIP Vessel which carriers all merchandise, excluding liquid in bulk
EX Previous ...

Draft of the Sail
The sail is the foil driving the boat. In order to maximize the speed of the boat in different conditions, you must change the depth of the foil. This depth is called the draft of the sail. Its size and location can be changed using the sail controls discussed below.

Draft or draught - The depth of a ship's keel below the waterline.
E
Ebb - A receding current, when the falling tide recedes out to sea and the water level lowers.

draft or draught - The vertical distance between the vessel's waterline and its lowest point; the lowest point may be the hull itself or an attachment (such as a rudder or propeller). The minimum water depth in which a boat will float.

Draft - 1. the depth of the curve of a sail 2. the vertical distance from the bottom of the keel to the waterline. (British - Draught) Compare to Depth and Headroom 2. the depth or fullness of a sail
Drag - the resistance caused by wind and water ...

Draft:
(1) The depth of the boat below the waterline; the amount of vertical distance from a boats water line to the bottom of it's keel.
(2) The depth of water necessary to float a vessel
(3) The belly or chord depth of the sail, its fullness ...

Draft
the depth of the boat at its lowest point, also the depth or fullness of the sail
Drift ...

Draft/Draught
The amount of vertical distance from a boat's water line to the bottom of it's keel. This is the depth of water required to float a vessel.
Draw ...

DRAFT - The depth of water a boat draws.
E
EASE - To slacken or relieve tension on a line.

Draft - Depth of the keel
Draft - Least depth of water needed to allow a boat to clear the bottom
Draw Bridge Signal - one long blast and three short blasts ...

Draft - The depth of water a boat draws.
Dry Sailing - When boats, especially smaller racers, are kept on shore instead of being left anchored or moored, they are dry sailed. The practice prevents marine growth
on the hull and the absorption of moisture into it.
E ...

Draft restrictions relate to speed in several ways. If there is little underkeel clearance, it is likely that shallower water is nearby. It is easier to avoid running aground from a low speed, and if a grounding cannot be avoided, the damage will be less.

Draft: The depth of water a boat draws.
Drift: 1. To move as driven or borne along by a current; to float or move along with the stream or wind 2. The angle which the line of a ship's motion makes with the nearest meridian, when she drives with her side to the wind and waves when laying to.

Draft or Draught - The depth of a ship's keel below the waterline.
Draft Marks - On ships, the stern and stem are marked in feet to show the draft or depth of the vessel.
Dressing Down - Treating old sails with oil or wax to renew them. Also a verbal reprimand.

Draft: See Draught.
Draught: The amount of the vessel which is under water.
Draught Forward: The vertical distance between the summer load line and the underside of the keel measured at the forward perpendicular (an imaginary vertical line at the intersection of the stem and the waterline).

Draught or draft - the depth to which a ship sinks in water, indicated by numerical marks in feet or metres at stem and stern of vessel.
Ensign - nation flag of the port where the ship is registered; it is flown at the stern of a ship.

Draft Distance between the waterline and the lowest part of the keel or hull. -The amount of bend in a sail's shape.

draft. 1, The depth of the boat underwater; as in: This boat has a 6 foot draft. 2, The amount of curve or fullness in a sail; as in: Moving the draft forward will reduce our weather helm.
drag.

Draft: Depth of water needed to float a vessel
Freeboard: Distance from water to lowest point of boat where water could come aboard
Starboard: Right side of a vessel
All-Round White Light: Indicates rear of a vessel
Stern: Rear of a vessel ...

Draft: The distance from the surface of the water to the ship's keel (how deep the ship is into the water).
Drag: A sea anchor contrived to keep a vessel's head to the wind and sea.

A protected water area in which vessels are moored. The term is often used to denote a pier or a wharf.
Dolphin
A group of piles driven close together and bound with wire cables into a single structure.
Draft
The depth of water a boat draws.

DR -- dead reckoning, deduced reckoning; your position based on speed, direction, and time
Draft - the depth of the boat at its lowest point, also the depth or fullness of the sail ...

Draft: The depth of water that a boat draws
Drift: Strength of a tidal current
Driving force: Force produced by catching wind in a sail and transmitting the energy into a the mast
Dry Sailing: The storage of boats onshore to reduce the deterioration of the material ...

draft: the depth a vessel extends below the waterline. DR: dead reckoning, deduced reckoning; your position based on speed, direction, and time.

the relative motion between a vessel and the reflective sea bottom (for bottom return mode) or suspended particulate matter in the seawater itself (for water return mode) by measuring the frequency shifts between a transmitted and subsequently echoed acoustic or electromagnetic signal.
Draft - ...

Downhaul-A rope used to haul down jibs, staysails and studding sails.
Double Sheetbend -Join small to medium size rope.
douse To drop a sail quickly
Draft-The depth of water required float a vessel
Drift- A vessel leeway ...

draft American spelling, see draught, British spelling, below. drag sails W: An alternative term for a sea anchor. drag the anchor F: the act of trailing it along the bottom, after it is loosened from the ground, by the effort of the wind or current upon the ship, communicated to the cable.

having the same draft forward and aft
of a person or situation: functioning normally after a period of difficulty
On another tack ...

DRAFT The depth of water a boat can travel over without hitting the bottom. DRY ROT A fungous decay causing seasoned lumber to become brittle and crumble to powder. Dry rot needs extended periods of moisture (fresh water), oxygen, and dry rot spores to thrive.
E Top ...

BALLAST WATER Sea water, confined to double bottom tanks, peak tanks, and other designated compartments, for use in obtaining satisfactory draft, trim, or stability.

draft -- water depth required to float the boat
ebb -- tide passing from high to low, with the current going out to sea
El Niño -- a warm inshore current annually flowing south along the coast of Ecuador.

to latch DRAFT the distance from a vessel's water line to the deepest part of the hull; the depth of water necessary to float a vessel EASE OFF to slack off or release tension slowly and smoothly EYE a loop or hole which is spliced or tied on the end of a line FATHOM six feet; 1.

Draft - least depth of water needed to allow a boat to clear the bottom.
Drift - speed of a current's flow.
DBWI - Driving a boat while intoxicated
Fairing Block- shim installed to adjust the angle of a mounted item.
Fair Lead - a line unobstructed between its terminals, such as ...

Draft (T): The depth from waterline to the deepest part of the ship.
Depth (D). Total depth from bottom to the top watertight deck. Depth = freeboard + draft.
Length Overall (LOA): The extreme length of the ship.

When sailing close hauled (position No. 2) the sails are hauled in to the stern corner of the boat as far and as flat as possible and still have draft (curve) enough to propel the boat.

DRAFT - The depth of water a boat draws.
FENDER - A cushion, placed between boats, or between a boat and a pier, to prevent damage.
FOLLOWING SEA - An overtaking sea that comes from astern.
FORWARD - Toward the bow of the boat.
GALLEY - The kitchen area of a boat.
HEAD - A marine toilet.

Boats with restricted maneuverability, whether due to fishing, draft, length, towing, or other causes, have the right of way over vessels not so restricted.

Pier-head jump - When a sailor is drafted to a warship at the last minute, just before she sails.
Pilot - Navigator. A specially knowledgeable person qualified to navigate a vessel through difficult waters, e.g. harbour pilot etc.

- Scope is defined as the ratio of the depth (draft plus freeboard) divided into the length of anchor line paid out. The typical minimum scope is from 3-5 with 7 being the best practical.

Halfway through dinner I suddenly felt a draft blowing through the main companionway; something was wrong-we were dragging anchor! I dashed up into the cockpit just in time to hear the horrible grinding of the boat's keel crashing into a coral head.

Draft - the amount of water required to float the vessel
Freeboard - the height of hull between the waterline and deck
Bilge - the lowest point within the hull; where waste tends to collect and requires bilge pump ...

The maximum draft (aft) is usually not more than about two feet nine inches. Boats up to fourteen feet wide can be found and these area called in a somewhat contradictory fashion wide beam narrow boats.

To postpone the induction of (one eligible for the military draft). verb, intransitive To procrastinate. [Middle English differren, to postpone, differ.] . de-ferıra-ble adjective . de-ferırer noun Synonyms: defer, postpone, shelve, stay, suspend.

Somewhere back in the early days, a draftsman with more artistic ability than technical knowledge produced the well-know design which shows an anchor with its cable hopelessly fouled around the shank and arms.

DORY A small, flat-bottomed boat with flaring sidesDRAFT The depth of a boat from the waterline to the bottom of the keel.
DOUBLE-ENDER; A boat which is ‘pointed' at both bow and stern, see also ‘CANOE STERN'.
DRY ROT A fungal decay in timber.

full keel - A keel that runs the length of the boat. Full keels have a shallower draft than fin keels.
fully battened - A sailsail having battens that run the full horizontal length of the sail.
fully stayed - A mast supported by the use of lines known as stays and shrouds.

skiffA small, simple, shallow-draft boat. skiing/wakeboarding boatLow profile, pleasure boats with minimal deadrise specifically designed for waterskiing and/or wakeboarding. These boats are usually characterized by an inboard engine and a towing pylon.

Cunningham: The cringle (grommet) on the luff (forward edge) of the sail used to achieve luff tension for draft control. (sail shaping)
Downhaul: Line used to tighten or tension the luff (forward edge) of the sail.
Ease: To let out... as in ease a sheet. (line) ...

After studying the chart and choosing a general protected area, look for a spot with the right depth: from a few feet deeper than the draft of your boat (at low tide) to as deep as 30-40 feet if necessary-if you have at least 200-300 feet of anchor rode.

CENTERBOARD-A pivoted board-like device that can be lowered to provide lateral resistance to the water in shoal draft vessels.
CLEW-Aftermost corner of a sail.
COAMING-Raised protection around a cockpit.

A vessel designed and equipped specifically for towing; as in: "During the docking of a ship, the pilot transmits orders to the tugs, and they respond with short whistle signals." Typically a tug has a deep draft, moderate freeboard, a spacious low afterdeck for bits and hawsers, ...

A mark on the side of a ship's hull which indicates a certain level of loading and, therefore, draft.
(Plimsoll marks on a ship's hull.)
Poopie Suit ...

The Ark Royal had a dsplacement of 22,000 tons. Shet was 721 ft. long at the waterline, 800 ft. long overall and had a 95 ft. beam. She had a 780 foot flight deck which was 96 feet wide. The carrier's draft was 22 feet, 9 in.

DOCK - The wharf or pier; to bring ship next to the pier
DRILL - A safety test ordered by the captain
DRAFT - Distance between the water surface and the keel
DUTY FREE - Refers to items that are sold free of import (duty) taxes
EMBARK - To go on board the ship ...

DOUBLE HEADSAIL RIG - Two sails forward of the mast as in a cutter.
Downhaul-A rope used to haul down jibs, staysails and studding sails.
Double Sheetbend -Join small to medium size rope.
douse To drop a sail quickly
Draft-The depth of water required float a vessel
Drift- A vessel leeway ...

DOLPHIN A group of piles driven close together and bound with wire cables into a single structure. DRAFT The depth of water a boat draws. DRAUGHT That depth of water which a vessel requires to float her. DROP The depth of sail, from head to foot, amidships.

DISPLACEMENT HULL - A type of hull that plows through the water, displacing a weight of water equal to its own weight, even when more power is added.
DOCK - A protected water area in which vessels are moored. The term is often used to denote a pier or a wharf.
DRAFT - The depth of water a boat draws.

The advantage of multihulled sailboats is that they do not suffer the performance penalty of having to carry heavy ballast, and their relatively lesser draft reduces the amount of drag, caused by friction and inertia, when moving through the water.

Full keels have a shallower draft than fin keels.
Full-rigged-ship a fully square rigged ship with three or more masts.
Fully battened -A sail having battens that run the full horizontal length of the sail.
Furl - to fold or roll a sail and secure it to its main support ...

See also: See also: What is the meaning of Vessel, Boat, Hull, Forward, Stern?

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