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Table 18: Characteristics of adult alcohol consumption in different regions of the world 2000 (population weighted averages)
Table 19: Alcohol-related harm in different regions of the world (population weighted averages), DALYs (000s) ...


Aquifer Characteristics
Groundwater is stored in the open spaces and fractures within geologic materials such as soil, sand, and rock that occur beneath the land surface.

Characteristics of Chromium
Chromium is odorless and tasteless. It occurs naturally in various types of rock, soil, ore and volcanic dust as well as in plants, animals and humans.

Characteristically hazardous waste: Any waste that exhibits the characteristics of ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, and/or toxicity as defined by the EPA in 40 CFR Part 261 Subpart C. These are often referred to as the "D" wastes.

Characteristic: Any one of the four categories used in defining hazardous waste: ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, and toxicity.

~ Waste: Waste that is considered hazardous under RCRA because it exhibits any four different properties: ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, and toxicity.

~s (e.g., race, sex, age, obesity) or variables (e.g., smoking, occupational exposure level) associated with increased probability of a toxic effect.
Source: Terms of the Environment
...

~s of invaders and invaded systems
Introduction of new species in marine environments
Ballast water as a vehicle for invading species ...

~s that are difficult to gather statistical data about; includes perceptions and intangible aspects of a community such as community spirit.
Quality of life ...

~ Curve: a) A curve to show the relation between two changing values b) Refers to one of a pair of conjugate curves in a surface, which has the property that the directions of the tangents through any point of the curve are the characteristic directions of the surface.

~ shape.
agrochemical. Synthetic chemicals (pesticide and fertilizers)
used in agricultural production.

A ~ which occurs mostly on proof coins as a result of a piece of lint on the die or planchet during the striking process. This lint creates an incused scratch-like mark on the coin.

A ~ of acidic and basic hazardous wastes.
The ~ is defined by a waste's pH and its ability to corrode steel. A waste is corrosive if it has a pH less than or equal to 2.0 or greater than or equal to 12.5. See pH, acids, bases
Creosotes ...

The ~s of the farm sector; most often used in describing changes in the number, size distribution, production traits, and business composition (i.e. type of ownership) of farms and agribusiness firms.
Definition source ...

The ~s factoring into coin grade, such as bag marks, luster, strike quality, and "eye appeal".
AU (About Uncirculated)
The grade of a coin having very minimal wear, just one step below Uncirculated.

The ~ number of protons per atom of an element. Used as an identifying attribute.
autotroph
An organism that synthesizes food molecules from inorganic molecules by using an external energy source, such as light energy.

The ~s, processes or reactions of a soil that are caused by physical forces, and are described by, or expressed in physical terms or equations.

The ~ features of a red-brown earth include:
an A horizon which is grey-brown to red-brown loamy sand to sandy clay loam;
an A horizon which is weakly structured to massive;
an abrupt to clear boundary between the A and B horizons; ...

Species characteristic of or prevalent in a particular or restricted locality or region.
Provided as a public service by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Reference list click here.
See also: Barrel , Tropospheric ozone , , Temperature , Water Vapor ...

Site and soil characteristics, combined with disturbances (human or natural) act to control the plant survival, health, density, and growth.

Hardness: characteristic of water which describes the presence of dissolved minerals. Carbonate hardness is caused by calcium and magnesium bicarbonate; noncarbonate hardness is caused by calcium sulfate, calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, and magnesium chloride.

hardness a characteristic of water, imparted by salts of calcium, magnesium, and iron, such as bicarbonates, carbonates, sulfates, chlorides, and nitrates that cause curdling of soap, deposition of scale in boilers, damage in some industrial process, and sometimes objectionable taste.

A species with characteristics that make it particularly sensitive to human activities or natural events.
spent pickle liquor
A liquid waste produced in metal finishing and similar industries. The liquid is acidic and contains heavy metals.

Homosexuality: characteristic of roughly 10% of any population. Recent evidence suggests a genetic component.

Risk factor
Characteristic (e.g., race, sex, age, obesity) or variable (e.g., smoking, occupational exposure level) associated with increased probability of a toxic effect.(1)
Siting
The process of choosing a location for a facility.(1) ...

The study of the characteristics and occurrence of water, and of the hydrological cycle.
Help us improve this term by expanding its description
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variable Any characteristic or attribute that can be measured.
variable charge The portion of a water bill that varies with water usage; also known as a commodity charge.

Impermeable: Characteristic of geologic materials that limit their ability to transmit significant quantities of water under the head differences normally found in the subsurface environment.

terrain: the characteristic features of a tract of land's surface; topography.
terrarium: a box, usually made of glass, that is used for keeping and observing small animals or plants.

Monitor: To track a characteristic, such as dissolved oxygen, nitrate level, or fish population, over a period of time using uniform methods to evaluate change.
Non-point Source: Diffuse, overland runoff containing pollutants. Includes runoff collected in storm drains.

Possesses at least one of four characteristics (ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, or toxicity), or appears on special EPA lists.

Horizon, soil - a layer of soil, approximately parallel to the surface, having distinct ~s produced by soil-forming
processes. In the identification of soil horizons, an uppercase letter represents the major horizons. Numbers or lower case ...

Patterns of climate variability Natural variability of the climate system, in particular on seasonal and longer time scales, predominantly occurs with preferred spatial patterns and time scales, through the dynamical ~s of the atmospheric circulation and through interactions with ...

The prefix 'ab-' emphasizes that the heritable ~s of an organism are consequences of the past and not anticipation of the present or future. Abiotic Non-living; usually applied to the physical and chemical aspects of an organism's environment.

airmass A widespread body of in the atmosphere that gains certain meteorological or polluted ~s while set in one location. The ~s can change as it moves away. albedo The fraction of the total solar radiation incident on a body that is reflected by it.

Toxicity ~s. Toxic Concentration-
TCDD- Dioxin (Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin)
TCDF- Tetrachlorodi-benzofurans
TCE- Trichloroethylene
TCF- Total Chlorine Free
TCLP- Total Concentrate Leachate Procedure. Toxicity ~ Leachate Procedure
TCM- Transportation Control Measure ...

Mercury (Hg)Mercury has unique technical ~s as it melts at a temperature as low as -39C. Vapour is produced at temperatures of as little as 20C, even if its boiling point is 375C.

Fundamental discoveries in UV technology research coupled with practical applications are the ~s of Dr. Linden' work. Dr.

In fact, the most important ~ of a desert is that it receives very little rainfall. Most deserts receive less than 300 mm a year compared to rainforests, which receive over 2,000 mm. That means that the desert only gets 10 percent of the rain that a rainforest gets! ...

GAC See granular activated carbon adsorption geological log A detailed description of all underground features discovered during the drilling of a well, including types of formations encountered and their physical ~s.

Radiation has different ~s depending upon the wavelength. Because the radiation from the Sun is relatively energetic, it has a short wavelength (ultra-violet, visible, and near infra-red).

The rhinoceros hornbill is named for its ~ 'casque,' the strange structure situated on top of the bird's bill. The uses of this 'horn' aren't fully understood but casques may play a role in attracting mates or amplifying bird calls.

Research design used to test etiological hypotheses in which inferences about exposure to the putative causal factor(s) are derived from data relating to ~s of the persons or organisms under study or to events or experiences in their past.

Permit-Required Confined Space (Permit Space): A confined space that has one or more of the following ~s: Contains or has a potential to contain a hazardous atmosphere (e.g., dependent upon work activities - cleaning with solvents, using degreasers); ...

EPA hazardous waste ~ defined with a rigorous test procedure, the TCLP (for Toxicity ~ Leaching Procedure). In the procedure, a waste is extracted for 24 hours with an acetic acid solution.

This includes substances on the EU Hazardous Waste List and a has one of more of the following hazardous ~s: explosive, oxidising, highly flammable, flammable, irritant, harmful, toxic, carcinogenic, corrosive, infectious, teratogenic, mutagenic, ...

commercial buildings, their energy-related building ~s, and their energy consumption and expenditures.

Two main ~s distinguish PDO from El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO): first, 20th century PDO "events" persisted for 20-to-30 years, while typical ENSO events persisted for 6 to 18 months; second, ...

Ecological Indicator: A ~ of an ecosystem that is related to, or derived from, a measure of biotic or abiotic variable, that can provide quantitative information on ecological structure and function. An indicator can contribute to a measure of integrity and sustainability.

basic Having the ~s of a base. Bohr's atom Bohr made significant contributions to the atom. He understood the line spectra-- the reason why only certain wavelengths are emitted when atoms jump down levels.

The air surrounding the Earth, described as a series of layers of different ~s. The atmosphere, composed mainly of nitrogen and oxygen with traces of carbon dioxide, water vapour and other gases, acts as a buffer between Earth and the sun.

Adaptation: a genetically determined ~ that enhances the ability of an organism to cope with its environment; any alteration or response of an organism that favors survival in a changed environment.
Aerenchyma: air-space tissue ...

Indicator: Any biological entity or process, or community whose ~s show the presence of specific environmental conditions or pollutants.
Indicator organisms: Microorganisms, such as coliforms, whose presence is indicative of pollution or of more harmful microorganism.

Air Pollution - The presence in the outdoor atmosphere of one or more air pollutants or any combination thereof in such quantities and of such ~s and duration as to be, or be likely to be, injurious to public welfare, to the health of human, plant or animal life, or to property, ...

Registration The procedure by which an organization indicates relevant ~s of a product, process or service, or particulars of an organization or person, and then includes or registers the product, process, or service in an appropriate publicly available list. See also certification.

Molecule (n) - the smallest particle of a compound that contains all the ~s of the compound.
Motting (adj) - marble-like pattern that occurs in soils where the water table fluctuates periodically.
Muck (n) - sediment that comes from dying plants and animals.

Abiota - Those non-living factors which are present in and affect the ~s of a given ecosystem.
Ablation -
(1) The process by which ice and snow waste away as a result of melting and/or evaporation.
(2) The erosive processes by which a glacier is reduced.

climate change - The slow variations of climatic ~s over time at a given place.
coagulation - Water treatment process in which chemicals are added to water that enables them to become attached to each other.

ruderal: Short-lived but highly fecund plants ~ of frequently disturbed environments with abundant resources.
run-of-the-river: A hydroelectric development that directly harnesses the flow of a river to drive turbines, without creating a substantial impoundment for water storage.

Weather: The condition of the atmosphere at a particular place and time. Some familiar ~s of the weather include wind, temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, cloudiness, and precipitation. Weather can change from hour to hour, day to day, and season to season.

Air Mass
A large volume of air with with similar temperature and moisture ~s. Air masses cover many hundreds or thousands of square miles, and slowly change in accordance with the surface below them ...

population - (1) the whole number of inhabitants in a country, region or area; (2) a set of individuals having a quality or ~ in common.
post consumer waste - waste collected after the consumer has used and disposed of it (e.g., the wrapper from an eaten candy bar).

Hedonic Pricing Approach : Derives values by decomposing market prices into components encompassing environmental and other ~s through studying property values, wages and other phenomena.

Motor oil and other oil-based chemicals can be recognized by a ~ rainbow-colored sheen. Click on image for larger view.

Mutagenicity
The property of a chemical that causes the genetic ~s of an organism to change in such a way that future generations are permanently affected.

Water quality -- A term used to describe the chemical, physical, and biological ~s of water, usually in respect to its suitability for a particular purpose.

Hazard which may be generally present throughout an operation or industry, but which may have widely different levels of risk, depending on specific site ~s.
Hazard
Object, physical effect, or a condition with potential to harm persons, property or environment.

Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S): A colorless, flammable, poisonous compound having a ~ rotten-egg odor. It is used in industrial processes and may be emitted into the air.
I ...

A group into which animals or plants are divided according to their shared ~s.
Stock Assessment ...

As these energised electrons fall back to their normal state, energy is released in the form of ~ discrete x-ray Photons which are unique to the element in question. The process is used in analytical techniques where element identification is required.

Population
A group or number of people living within a specified area or sharing similar ~s (such as occupation or age).

Air pollution is a broad term applied to all physical (particulate matter), chemical, and biological agents that modify the natural ~s of the atmosphere.

Infiltration - Infiltration is the process of water entering the soil. Often of concern is the infiltration rate - the rate at which water enters soil. This will be dependent on ~s of the soil and use, vegetative cover, moisture content, and other factors.

The rate of infiltration is influenced by the physical ~s of the soil, soil cover (i.e. plants), water content of the soil, soil temperature, and rainfall intensity. The terms infiltration and percolation are often used interchangeably.

Hazardous Waste: By-products of society that can pose a substantial or potential hazard to human health or the environment when improperly managed. They have at least one of four ~s: they are ignitable, corrosive, reactive, or toxic.

Addiction-To function normally, the body relies on a substance and there is a physical dependency on the substance as well. If that substance is taken away, it causes withdrawal, that is accompanied by a ~ set of signs and symptoms.

Thus, surfaces with a high albedo (e.g., snow and ice) generally contribute to cooling, whereas surfaces with a low albedo (e.g., forests) generally contribute to warming. Changes in land use that significantly alter the ~s of land surfaces can therefore influence the climate through ...

See also: See also: What is the meaning of Environment, Water, Table, Health, Environmental?

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