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Dry Line

Meteorology  Dry bulb thermometer  Dry Microburst

Dry Line a moisture boundary
A dry line is a boundary that separates a moist air mass from a dry air mass. Also called a "Dew Point Front", sharp changes in dew point temperature can be observed across a dry line.


A dry line or dew point line is a boundary separating moist and dry air masses, and an important factor in severe weather frequency in the Great Plains of North America.

Dry Line - A boundary separating moist and dry air masses, and an important factor in severe weather frequency in the Great Plains.

Dry line
A boundary separating a moist and dry air mass. Shown on a synoptic chart as a trough. Dry lines are common across inland QLD during the warmer months of the year where convection will occur on the eastern side.

Dry Line - A boundary between moist air and dry air with little or no temperature difference during mid-day. It often serves as a focus for convective initiation.

DRY LINE The boundary between the dry desert air mass of the Southwest U.S. and the moist air mass from the Gulf of Mexico. It usually lies north-south across the central and southern High Plains states during spring and summer.

Dry line - A boundary between warm, dry air and warm, humid air in the southeast sector of a mature midlatitude cyclone; likely site for severe thunderstorm development.

Dry Line - A boundary which separates warm, dry air from warm, moist air. The differences in the two air masses may be significant. The dry line is usually a boundary of instability along which thunderstorms form.

DRY LINE - Region of drier, and sometimes cooler air from the Southwest US that pushes eastward. If the air to the east of the dryline is moist and unstable, the dryline will trigger thunderstorms.

dry lineRoughly a north-south boundary between moist air in the Mississippi Valley and dry air on the west side of the Great Plains descending from the Mexican Plateau and Southern Rockies.

It is associated with a linear type mesoscale convective system that moves along and in advance of a cold front or dry line.

New thunderstorms often develop along outflow boundaries, especially near the point of intersection with another boundary (cold front, dry line, another outflow boundary, etc.; see triple point).

The dry line typically advances eastward during the afternoon and retreats westward at night. However, a strong storm system can sweep the dry line eastward into the Mississippi Valley, or even further east, regardless of the time of day.

LP storms almost always occur on or near the dry line, and thus are sometimes referred to as dry line storms. LPSLoop Prominence System- In solar-terrestrial terms, a system of loop prominences associated with major flares.

However, a strong storm system can sweep the dry line eastward into the Mississippi Valley, or even further east, regardless of the time of day.

The intersection point between two boundaries (dry line, outflow boundary, cold front, etc.), often a focus for thunderstorm development.

TRIPLE POINT- The intersection point between two boundaries (dry line, outflow boundary, cold front, etc.), often a focus for thunderstorm development.

Radar identification often is difficult relative to other types of supercells, so visual reports are very important. LP storms almost always occur on or near the dry line, and thus are sometimes referred to as dry line storms.

Browse Related Terms: Bow Echo, Dry Line Storm, Isohel, Isohyet, Line Echo Wave Pattern, LN, Outer Convective Band, Plow Wind, Pre-Frontal Squall Line, Pre-Hurricane Squall Line, SQLN, Squall Line, Thin Line Echo, Tilt, Tornado Family ...

See also: See also: Air, Temperature, Storm, Weather, Thunder

Meteorology  Dry bulb thermometer  Dry Microburst

 
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