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Radiational cooling

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radiational cooling - In meteorology, the result of radiative cooling of the earth's surface and adjacent air.


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The cooling of the Earth's surface. At night, the Earth suffers a net heat loss to space due to terrestrial cooling. This is more pronounced when you have a clear sky.

Radiational Cooling - The cooling of the lower atmosphere during the nighttime hours. This, in combination with light surface winds and relatively clear skies, will often set the stage for fog.

Radiational cooling The process by which the earth's surface and adjacent air cool by emitting infrared radiation.
Radiation fog Fog produced over land when radiational cooling reduces the air temperature to or below its dew point. It is also known as ground fog and valley fog.

RADIATIONAL COOLING- The earth's surface cooling by emitting longwave radiation. The best radiational cooling occurs on clear nights.

~- Cooling process of the Earth's surface and adjacent air, which occurs when infrared (heat) energy radiates from the surface of the Earth upward through the atmosphere into space.

~The cooling of the Earth's surface. At night, the Earth suffers a net heat loss to space due to terrestrial cooling. This is more pronounced when you have a clear sky.

Fog created when radiational cooling at the earth's surface lowers the temperature of the air near the ground to or below its initial dew point. Primarily takes place at night or early morning.
Related term: radiation fog
GROWING SEASON ...

~ The cooling of the earth's surface and the adjacent air. Although it occurs primarily at night, it is whenever the earth's surface suffers a net loss of heat due to the reradiation of surface heat. See terrestrial radiation.

Nocturnal InversionUsed interchangably with Radiational Inversion; a temperature inversion that develops during the night as a result of radiational cooling of the surface.

Like friction, the effects of insolation and radiational cooling are strongest within this layer.

It is within this layer that temperatures are most strongly affected by daytime insolation and nighttime radiational cooling, and winds are affected by friction with the earth's surface. The effects of friction die out gradually with height, so the "top" of this layer cannot be defined exactly.

Used interchangably with Radiational Inversion; a temperature inversion that develops during the night as a result of radiational cooling of the surface.

Since warm air is less dense than cool air, the air over land contracts in response to radiational cooling from the ground below. This contraction leads to a decrease in the distance, or "thickness", between constant pressure surfaces within the cooled air.

Radiation inversion
An increase in temperature with height due to radiational cooling of the earth's surface. Also called a nocturnal inversion.
Radiosonde
A balloon-borne instrument that measures and transmits pressure, temperature, and humidity to a ground-based receiving station.

Radiation fog A ground-level fog formed by nocturnal radiational cooling of a humid air layer so that its relative humidity approaches 100 %; sometimes called ground fog.
Radio waves Long-wavelength, low-frequency electromagnetic waves.

A local wind which develops due to cool, dense air flowing downhill. The cooler air is generally a result of night time radiational cooling in the lower layers of the atmosphere, but katabatic winds also occur over snow fields and glaciers. See also anabatic winds.
Katafront ...

radiation fogFog characteristically resulting when radiational cooling of the earth's surface lowers the air temperature near the ground to or below its initial dew point on calm, clear nights.

There are four common causes of a temperature inversion: radiational cooling, advection of warm air over cold air as in frontal situations, advection of warm air over a cold surface such as snow or ice, and subsidence, the sinking of air which is then warmed by compression.

See also: See also: What is the meaning of Temperature, Weather, Surface, Air, Meteor?

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