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Rotation

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Rotation Process of the Earth turning on its axis. Rotationm determines day and night, and the length of the day. Compare with revolution.
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Rotation in the opposite sense from Earth's rotation, i.e. clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere as seen from above. The opposite of cyclonic rotation.
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A rotation-type anemometer consists of an array of three (or four) hemispherical cups mounted symmetrically about a vertical rotation axis.

La rotation de la terre fait dévier les mouvements de l'air et de l'eau partout sauf à l'Équateur, phénomène connu sous le nom d'effet de Coriolis.

If rotation is observed, then the term dust whirl or debris cloud should be used.
*Dust Whirl - A rotating column of air rendered visible by dust. Similar to debris cloud; see also dust devil, gustnado, tornado.

The rotation of a tropical storm is more recognizable than for a tropical depression. Tropical storms can cause a lot of problems even without becoming a hurricane. However, most of the problems a tropical storm cause stem from heavy rainfall.

the rotation of the earth which causes winds to be deflected to the right in the northern hemisphere and to the left in the southern hemisphere.

TORQUE - Rotational force applied to the propeller.
TORQUE EFFECT - The tendency for an aircraft to roll the opposite way the propeller is rotating due to drag on the propeller.

A area of rotation of storm size that may often be found on the southwest part of a supercell. Its circulation can be larger than the tornado that may develop within it, but not necessarily.

Bartel's Rotation Number
The serial number assigned to 27-day rotation periods of solar and geophysical parameters. Rotation 1 in this sequence was assigned arbitrarily by Bartel to begin in January 1833.
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The Earth's rotation imparts an acceleration known as the Coriolis effect, Coriolis acceleration, or colloquially, Coriolis force. This acceleration causes cyclonic systems to turn towards the poles in the absence of strong steering currents.

(or cyclonic rotation) Circulation (or rotation) which is in the same sense as the Earth's rotation, i.e., clockwise (in the Southern Hemisphere) as seen from above. Winds around synoptic-scale low pressure systems circulate cyclonically.

ANTI-CYCLONIC ROTATION Rotation opposite that of the earth. For example, clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere as would be seen from a view above. The opposite of cyclonic rotation.

Cyclonic - Rotation in the same sense that the earth rotates, counter-clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere. Wind around a low; subgeostrophic.

Anticyclonic Rotation Rotation in the opposite sense as the Earth's rotation. In the Northern Hemisphere, this would be clockwise as would be seen from above.
Antlophobia The fear of floods.

Rotation anemometer A type of anemometer in which the rotation of an element serves to measure the wind.

In reality, the rotation of the Earth changes everything. The rise of air in the equatorial region reduces surface air pressure, creating an equatorial low pressure zone (Equatorial Low).

RotationThe spinning of a body, such as the earth, about its axis.ROTGRotatingRotor CloudA turbulent altocumulus cloud formation found in the lee of some mountain barriers when winds cross the barrier at high speed.

VORTICITY- Any rotation within a horizontal or vertical windflow.
VORT MAX, VORT LOBE- Highest value of vorticity. A region of maximum vorticity. A wind flow through a vort max will produce divergence downwind from the vort max.

3) Analyze areas of rotation (when generated from one AZRAN to another).

A sidereal day is equivalent to one complete rotation of the earth relative to the equinox, which is 23 hours, 56 minutes, and 4.091 seconds.

It is used to aid in displaying shear and rotation in storms and storm top divergence that might otherwise be obscured by the storm's motion, investigate the 3-D velocity structure of a storm, ...

GeosynchronousTerm applied to any equatorial satellite with an orbital velocity equal to the rotational velocity of the earth.

Fujiwhara effectThe Fujiwhara effect describes the rotation of two storms around each other.Funnel cloudA rotating, cone-shaped column of air extending downward from the base of a thunderstorm but not touching the ground.

AnticycloneA large-scale circulation of winds around a central region of high atmospheric pressure, clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere, counterclockwise in the Southern HemisphereAnticyclonic RotationRotation in the opposite sense as the ...

Is any rotation observed in the cloud elements etc? What was the wind regime, before, during and after the event? Note particularly the onset of notable gustiness, changes of wind in direction/speed as compared with onset of precipitation etc.

The serious tornado is aided by rotation aloft, especially at the edges of large mesoscale rotating convective storms. Again, centrifugal force aids the formation of a core of low pressure that hurries air upwards.

Since the earth is rotating, the force observed as gravity is the resultant of the force of gravitation and the centrifugal force arising from this rotation. It is directed normal to sea level and to its geopotential surfaces.

An effect of the earth's rotation that deflects the direction of any large moving object (including the wind) to the right in the Northern Hemisphere, and to the left in the Southern Hemisphere.

The deflection (to the right in the northern hemisphere) is caused by the rotation of the earth.Corrective Action Report (CAR)Used to identify and document problems with ARM systems, physical infrastructure, or instruments.

TORNADO - A region of rotation extending from the base of a thunderstorm or other convective cloud to the earth's surface. This is a vortex, or wind velocity field, with a speed of at least 40 MPH at the surface.

This daily rotation of the earth means that in 24 hours a point on its equator moves a distance of some 40 000 kilometres, giving it a tangential velocity of about 1670 kilometres per hour (or roughly 1000 mph).

an instrument which measures wind speed or wind speed and direction; a cup anemometer measures the wind speed from the speed of rotation of a windmill which consist of 3 or 4 hemispherical or conical cups, ...

See also: See also: Surface, Air, Weather, Pressure, Cloud

Meteorology  Rossby waves  Rotor cloud

 
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