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Lees

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Keeping the wine on the lees, especially if they are stirred from time to time, may be beneficial to the wine, imparting extra flavour and body. Eventually, however, they must be removed. This may be achieved by racking the wine off the lees.


/ y Created by dead yeast cells and other solid matter which collects at the bottom of the container after fermentation.

Lees
This is the sediment consisting of dead yeast cells and other debris that accumulates on the bottom of the fermentation vessel. If the wine is kept on the lees, especially if they are stirred occasionally, may impart extra flavour and body.

:
Deposit which forms in the vats after fermentation or storage of the wine, forced from impurities, yeast, tartar and residual matter from the crop.
Legs : ...

Lees
The sediment from young wines while still in the barrel, tank or vat. Racking is the process of removing the wine and leaving the lees behind.

: Sediment remaining in a barrel or tank during and after fermentation. Often used as in sur lie aging, which indicates a wine is aged "on its ." See also sur lie.

Lees: Solids-including spent yeast cells, grape pulp and seeds-that settle out of a wine during fermentation and aging.', '', 250)"; onMouseout="hideddrivetip()"Lees ...

: Natural sediment left by the wine following its first fermentation.

Lees: The residue that forms in wine during fermentation. Made up of dead yeast cells, grape seeds, skins and tartrates, it is usually separated from the wine, typically by means of racking as soon as possible.

: Heavy sediment (dregs) left in the barrel by fermenting wines; a combination of spent yeast cells and grape solids.

Lees
The solids left behind after FERMENTATION is complete: dead YEAST cells and grape matter. White wines matured in contact with the lees (in French, Sur Lie) can develop creamy, nutty flavours.
Length
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are the solids left at the bottom of a fermentation vat after fermentation.

Lees
Any residue that settles out of wine after fermentation, made of grape solids or dead yeast cells.
Length
A term describing the sustained sensory impression across the tongue of fine wines.

- The solids which settle to the bottom of a barrel or vat as a wine ferments and ages. In some wines the are stirred on a regular basis to create a richer fuller mouth feel in the wines. Wines undergo racking to remove these sediments.

Lees: Solid residue (mostly dead yeast cells and grape pulp, pips and skins) that remains in a barrel or tank after the wine has been drawn off.

—The sediment that accumulates in the bottom of a container during fermentation. Some wine is aged "on the " ("sur lie").

Lees - Wine sediment that occurs during and after fermentation, and consists of dead yeast, grape seeds, and other solids. Wine is separated from the lees by racking.


The deposits which gather at the bottom of the carboy during winemaking (also known as trub).

Lees
Deposits in the cask or bottle, comprised of grape skins, pulp, and yeast that accumulate during fermentation. In most cases this sediment is separated from the wine through racking.

: dregs or sediments that settles at the bottom of a bottle or container
Legs: The streams that run down the sides of a glass when swirled, it indicates a rich, full-bodied wine.

Lees
are the sediment consisting of dead yeast cells, grape pulp, seeds and pigment that drop to the bottom of a vessel during and after a wine's fermentation.

- The sediment made up of mainly spent yeast cells that are deposited in the storage vessel. The are left behind by racking.

Lees (Lies)
When fermentation is complete, the yeast cells die and fall to the bottom of the vat to become the lees. Some wines are left on this sediment of dead yeast cells to enrich their aromas.


[LEEZ]
The heavy, coarse sediment that accumulates during fermentation and aging. primarily consists of dead yeast cells and small grape particles. In most cases this sediment is separated from the wine through racking.

lees: The residue that forms in wine during fermentation. It is comprised mainly of dead yeast cells and grape pulp. It is usually separated from the wine by pumping the wine off, leaving the residue behind - a process known as racking.

: The sediment which settles to the bottom of the wine in a tank during processing. If primarily yeast, as from a fermentation, it is called "yeast ;" if sediment from fining, it is called "fining ." ...

Lees Dead yeast cells, which form a deposit at the bottom of a tank after the alcoholic fermentation. Winemakers may age the wine in the presence of the lees, to protect from oxidation and provide a more complex flavour.


The gunk that settles at the bottom of a fermentation or ageing vessel.

Lees
A heavy sediment consisting of dead yeast cells and other solid matter such as grape pulp, seeds and other grape particles.


Sediment and yeast found in a barrel or tank during and after fermentation. Increasingly, winemakers are using the old technique of aging the wine on the to increase complexities in the aromas and flavors.

Lees: (Lees is both singular and plural, though the word doesn't look like it ought to be). It is the sediment that settles to the bottom of a wine in a tank during processing.


Sediments resulting from the fermentation of wine (yeast remnants, colloidal matter, and other remains).
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Lees : Lees are the solid element which precipitates at the end of the fermentation; cells of dead yeast, pulp of berries and, in red wines, pips and grape-skin.

See also: See also: Wine, Grape, Fermentation, Bottle, White

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